On the Tain Way

A place of myth and wonder on foot and approachable

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On Monday, June 9, 2014, cousin John Mills dropped his son, Sean Mills, myself and Pam Wills off at the foot of the western slopes of Slieve Foy on the Tain Way.  Sean, Pam and I walked the way over the mountain and into Carlingford in the footsteps of epic Irish heroes.

Our guide, Sean Mills, proposed the walk and it fell on our last full day in Ireland. Sean’s father and our host for this visit, John Mills, transported the group including my wife Pam to the starting point at the foot of Slieve Foy.

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Yes, if there is any part of the Tain Way the the mythic Irish heroes trod it is this one over Slieve Foy mountain. The saga, in Irish “Táin Bó Cúailnge” and “The Cattle Raid of Cooley” in English, features this bull, “Donn Cuailnge” “The Brown Bull of Cooley”, here as a statue erected 2011 by the Grange and District Residents Association.

Walking the Tain Trail to Carlingford

Donn Cuailnge raged over the very slopes we walked this day. The myths themselves fill a volume and I am unable to do them justice here.

On the way, John stopped at the Old Aghameen School he attended in the late 1930’s early 1940’s 70 years before and we pass through the country soon to grace our views.

Many thanks to the Glenmore Athletic Club, the Cooley Walking Forum and land owners who provide access to the Tain Way.

We had our leave taking with John, who planned to stay near the phone for our call from Carlingford, if all went according to plan. That same year Pam had the first of two total knee replacements. This was our longest hike in Ireland and Pam was not likely to miss it, regardless of any pain. Pam is always ready to smile.

Walking the Tain Trail to Carlingford

At start, the Tain Way is broad, green and welcoming.

Walking the Tain Trail to Carlingford Walking the Tain Trail to Carlingford

Walking the Tain Trail to Carlingford

The western slopes of Slieve Foy hold views of a valley among the Cooley Mountains with Dundalk Bay of the Irish Sea to the south / southeast. It was not long before the view started to open and, then, opened and opened the entire walk to the top. We were graced with a lovely, cloudy, June day. Mist only, no rain. Plenty of wind, not strong.

Walking the Tain Trail to Carlingford Walking the Tain Trail to Carlingford

Walking the Tain Trail to Carlingford

Farms are all about. Here a farmer attends to the flock. They know who he is.

Walking the Tain Trail to Carlingford The lower slopes hold many small stream among granite stones. Walking the Tain Trail to Carlingford Walking the Tain Trail to Carlingford Walking the Tain Trail to Carlingford Walking the Tain Trail to Carlingford Walking the Tain Trail to Carlingford

I will continue with our walk on the Tain Way soon enough.

Here’s my next Ireland posting…..

Here’s a previous Ireland posting……

Copyright 2017 Michael Stephen Wills All Rights Reserved

17 thoughts on “On the Tain Way

  1. My ex-husband had Mills in his family, a Reverend David Mills lived in Maine. (U.S.) There were also some Charles Mills family members in Chicago, Illinois. I’m sure it is a common name. I just paid attention to this grand hike with its reminiscings. Beautiful countryside! 🙂

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    1. Mills is not so common in Ireland. That clan is the only one they know of. Its mostly English, Scottish. My name is Wills, so it is a little confusing at first. Thanks for visiting and so happy to hear of your enjoyment.

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  2. I sure enjoyed this hardy hike on the Tain Way, Michael — full of history, and now so beautiful with the emerald fields, granite stones, grazing sheep. Your photos are really beautiful, I love that one with the small waterfall in the foreground, it demonstrates the abundant moisture and slope, a surprise.

    Liked by 1 person

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