Autumn Evening Hike Part 2 of 3

Water runs through it

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 Portrait of Mill Falls

In part 2 of this series, we return to the starting point. Siting of a water mill requires immediate access to the potential energy of falling water, something called “head.” Upper Treman Park was once a prosperous hamlet with the mill as the kernel. Today, the head that drove the mill is a lovely cascade behind the substantial and intact mill building. Easy walking distance from parking, this is a well known park feature.

Here are three versions of a portrait of Mill Falls using different lenses for varying effects. All were taken in the same season and approximate time of day, being early evening.

Mill Waterfall, evening, low flow
Full waterfall environment captured using the 24 mm lens with a 0.6 nd filter.
Click link for “Mill Waterfall at low flow”, a fine art print from my gallery.
Mill Falls
Portrait of multiple waterfall cascades using 70 mm lens, UV filter.

This is the uncropped image used in part 1 of this series. I found the secondary cascade a distraction. Exposure of the secondary is difficult to balance against the primary and more shaded primary.

Mill Falls
Portrait of the major waterfall cascade.

Click link for “Mill Waterfall Primary Low Flow” fine art print.

Stone Span

Let’s return to where part 1 left off, the stone bridge across the eastern side of the gorge entrance gallery.

Foot Bridge
The bridge is a necessity, at this point the southern side becomes difficult to navigate.

This segmental arch is an illusion, the beautiful stone work is the facing of the concrete structure that carries to load of the stone, itself and visitors.

Stone Bench
A limestone bench at the foot of a sedimentary cliff, layering so fine it is difficult to make out the strata.
Want more? Click the link for my Online Gallery

My composition emphasizes the mass of rock wall above the bench and into which it is placed.  The limestone slabs are from a different source, they are not built from the material removed from the cliff.

Seeds and Flowers

EveningWalkTremanGorge-11

A dandelion on steroids.  If you can help with identification of this plant, please post a comment.

Asters
A shower of floral stars skattered throughout our walk.

Click the link for my “Ad Astra” fine art print, in my gallery.

Blue Asters
Blue asters, multiple stalks branch out from the main.

Click the link for my “Purple Asters” fine art print, in my gallery.

Look Back!!

Footbridge and Gorge
This is the footbridge at east side of gorge gallery entrance, seen from the east where the trail descends.

Many first time visitors do not look back to appreciate these scene.  When we give advice, our recommendation is to return on the same gorge trail.  The different viewpoints make for a fresh experience.

Mr. Toad

Toad on Gorge Steps
Toads hide from passing feet at the base of step risers, among the plants and dried leaves.
Want more? Click the link for my Online Gallery

The are like people, sitting there.  Kenneth Graham’s genius, in writing “Wind in the Willows”, was to recognize the likable characteristics of the toad.  I find myself concerned about their survival, although they must survive.  Earlier in the season they are pea sized.  I resist an inclination to move them to what may be a more promising location, preferably with a stone house and chrome brilliant motor car.

Stone work and asters
A fine limestone wall, asters. I need help naming the white flowering plants, there is a vine, mosses and much else in view.

Continued……..

Click me for Part 1 of this hike on the gorge trail of Treman Park.

Copyright 2017 Michael Stephen Wills All Rights Reserved

12 thoughts on “Autumn Evening Hike Part 2 of 3

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