Hepatica

Early Spring Beauties

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Most every year since 2002 I’ve photographed these personable beauties, the first wildflowers to bloom as early as late February through the snows.

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Click photograph for a larger version
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Copyright 2019 All Rights Reserved Michael Stephen Wills

27 thoughts on “Hepatica

  1. I was delighted to see this early Spring flower.

    The white one ” Anemone Nemorosa ” is called Vitsippa in Sweden and one that brings smiles to everyone. They are out now.
    Anemone Hepatica ( Blåsippa comes very soon after. Such a delight.

    Thank you for this morning’s smile

    miriam

    Liked by 5 people

    1. Anemone Nemorosa is a lovely plant, as well. It has a thicker growth than hepatica and the flower is much larger, about 2.5 the diameter. It must be a joy to see the massed flowers. I enjoy learning about wildflowers, thank you Miriam.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. A friend in Canada posted some of these recently (a new flower to me), and asked what we thought the collective noun for them might be. I suggested a ‘happiness of Hepatica,’ and your photos make me even more sure that might be the right word.

    Liked by 4 people

  3. By coincidence we were looking for hepatica flowers yesterday in a nearby city park where it appeared 2 years ago. No luck this time, but found other spring flowers like anemone nemorosa. Now winter is definitely over.

    Liked by 4 people

    1. Hepatica shares scientific classification categories up to the Tribe Anemoneae and has a different Genus, Hepatica compared to Anemone. Growth habits are quite different. Around here, the Anemone is on a very long, strong stem, has a much larger flower. Hepatica grow close to the ground on tender, hairy stems. Some botanists see a broad association between Hepatica and Anemone which is why is found its way into my tags.

      Like

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