Slievenaglogh View, east, V

Looking east

This the fifth and final of a series of landscape photographs taken from this position. Click for the first post of this series.

Click photograph for a larger view. To do this from WordPress Reader, you need to first click the title of this post to open a new page.

The peak is named, in the English language, Slievenaglogh. It is so strange as it’s not English, being instead a transliteration of the Irish name “Sliabh na gCloch.” This is “Rock Mountain” translated literally. Slievenaglogh is carried to the townland, a long thin swath of land being the peak and associated ridge-line.

The rocks up there are called “gabbro,” a type of magma slowly cooled under ground. Slievenaglog, Slieve Foy across the valley, and the Morne mountains all formed within volcano magma chamber(s) of the Paleocene, 66 million years ago, a time associated with extensive volcanism and the Cretaceous–Paleogene extinction event that gave rise to the current age.

Our younger cousin has been up there, optimistically we left it for a later trip.

Click for another interesting post and story from County Louth.

Here is a slide show of this landscape series.

A link with interesting reading on County Louth geology.
Copyright 2020 All Rights Reserved Michael Stephen Wills

10 thoughts on “Slievenaglogh View, east, V

  1. I don’t remember for sure, perhaps another one, but on this blog
    But it’s great this this seems to have come through now
    I’m not so good with IT and sometimes my comments and likes don’t show on some blogs and I don’t know why

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