Abandoned II

So much depended on this wagon

Quickly moving sheep pass the hay wagon on May morning, early. A great start to this week.

Click photograph for a larger view. To do this from WordPress Reader, you need to first click the title of this post to open a new page.

This mountainside pasture is grazed by a flock of sheep alongside a long unused farm wagon. Slievenaglogh Townland, Cooley Peninsula, County Louth, Ireland.

This is the fifth of a series using the Canon EF 200mm f/2.8L USM lens.

Here is a recap of recent posts with the 200 and 24 mm lens. Can you tell the difference?

Click for another interesting Ireland post and story

Copyright 2020 All Rights Reserved Michael Stephen Wills

Balwen? Shetland?

Or neither?

This breed may be a Balwen Welsh Mountain sheep, as it fits the description. When the ewe caught sight of me, she hightailed it for cover, the lambs followed.

Click photograph for a larger view. To do this from WordPress Reader, you need to first click the title of this post to open a new page.

The Balwen is bred for meat and that is the rule in this area, the lambs are sold.

The description is of a black color with a white blaze on the face, four white “socks” and white on the tail. This individual is missing a white tale, so might be a Shetland and even more so as the others of the herd are white (Shetlands are a variety of colors), Shetland is common and the other rare.

These are on the hillside of Slievenaglogh Townland, County Louth, Ireland.

This is the fourth of a series using the Canon EF 200mm f/2.8L USM lens.

Click for another interesting Ireland post and story

Copyright 2020 All Rights Reserved Michael Stephen Wills

Abandoned

So much depended on this wagon

A hay wagon, unused since the twentieth century.

Click photograph for a larger view. To do this from WordPress Reader, you need to first click the title of this post to open a new page.

No longer needed, this mountainside pasture is grazed by a flock of sheep. Slievenaglogh Townland, Cooley Peninsula, County Louth, Ireland.

This is the third of a series using the Canon EF 200mm f/2.8L USM lens.

Click for another interesting Ireland post and story

Copyright 2020 All Rights Reserved Michael Stephen Wills

On the slopes of Slievenaglogh

One white horse

Horse pasture on northeast slope of Slievenaglogh peak (Irish: Sliabh na gCloch) on the road from Mullaghattin Townland to Riverstown.

Click photograph for a larger view. To do this from WordPress Reader, you need to first click the title of this post to open a new page.

Foreground is yellow flowered gorse (whin bush, scientific name Ulex). Early morning, late May 2014.

This is the second of a series using the Canon EF 200mm f/2.8L USM lens.

Click for another interesting Ireland post and story

Copyright 2020 All Rights Reserved Michael Stephen Wills

Slievenaglogh View, east, V

Looking east

This the fifth and final of a series of landscape photographs taken from this position. Click for the first post of this series.

Click photograph for a larger view. To do this from WordPress Reader, you need to first click the title of this post to open a new page.

The peak is named, in the English language, Slievenaglogh. It is so strange as it’s not English, being instead a transliteration of the Irish name “Sliabh na gCloch.” This is “Rock Mountain” translated literally. Slievenaglogh is carried to the townland, a long thin swath of land being the peak and associated ridge-line.

The rocks up there are called “gabbro,” a type of magma slowly cooled under ground. Slievenaglog, Slieve Foy across the valley, and the Morne mountains all formed within volcano magma chamber(s) of the Paleocene, 66 million years ago, a time associated with extensive volcanism and the Cretaceous–Paleogene extinction event that gave rise to the current age.

Our younger cousin has been up there, optimistically we left it for a later trip.

Click for another interesting post and story from County Louth.

Here is a slide show of this landscape series.

A link with interesting reading on County Louth geology.
Copyright 2020 All Rights Reserved Michael Stephen Wills

April Freeze Slideshow

from the moss

Here is a recapitulation of my latest posts in the form of a slideshow.

Click photograph to start show. To do this from WordPress Reader, you need to first click the title of this post to open a new page.

Robert H. Treman New York State Park.

Copyright 2019 All Rights Reserved Michael Stephen Wills

Icicle Macro

from the moss

The entire wall above the Cliff Stair is a ground water seep caught here by a sudden April frost.

Click photograph for a larger view. To do this from WordPress Reader, you need to first click the title of this post to open a new page.

When the icicles melt, the moss is there relishing the moisture. Here is a link to some fascinating information from an earlier post, “Finger Lakes Water Chemistry.”

Robert H. Treman New York State Park.

Click for macro slideshow.

Copyright 2019 All Rights Reserved Michael Stephen Wills