Farmland Southeast of Carlingford

Beauty of the Cooley Peninsula, County Louth, Ireland

I offer here a continuation of descriptions of a 2014 walk on the Tain Way, an appreciation of the lore and beauty of Ireland.

Descending the Tain Way from the ridge of Golyin Pass the sweep of Cooley Peninsula spread before us. Louth is the smallest of the Irish Republic counties, a peninsula which is mountainous where it is not farmland, one exception being Carlingford with the most people, population 1,405 in 2016.

Residential Carlingford continues along the Greenore Road, farmland adjoins then continues southeast along the Cooley Peninsula margin, the Irish Sea beyond. Greenore Town and deep water port on upper left.  These photographs are views from the Tain Way on the slopes of Slieve Foye, the highest mountain of County Louth.

Greenore Town and Deepwater Port
Click this link for my Ireland gallery of Fine Art Photography.

Wander through the place names: Chapel Hill, Liberties of Carlingford, Moneymore, Leminageh, Crossalaney, Mullatee, Millgrange, Ramparts, Muchgrange, Ballyamony, Mullabane, Petestown, Ballagane, Willville, Whites Town.
There is a deepwater port on Carlingford Lough adjacent to and part of Greenore Town. The port employed Cousin John Mills years ago, supplementing his farm income. Across the lough is Greenecastle, Newry in Northern Ireland.

Greenore Town and Deepwater Port

The Irish Sea opens on the far side of Greenore with the Isle of Man about 52 miles east and a little north.

Visit the opening chapter of our time on the Tain Way
Click link for the next posting of this series, “Leprechaun Rock along the Tain Way”

Copyright 2021 Michael Stephen Wills All Rights Reserved

Irish Countryside: the Old Aghameen School

A schoolhouse ruin on the Cooley Peninsula near the Tain trail

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On Monday, June 9, 2014 John Mills, the first cousin of my mother, Catherine Wills nee McArdle, showed us the ruin of the schoolhouse used in the 1930 / 1940’s and which he attended as would Catherine if her parents hadn’t emigrated to Canada in the 1920’s.  Free public schooling was mandated in Ireland from 1831 and by the 1850s most Irish parishes had a schoolhouse, such as this in Ballymascanlon civil parish, as part of the National Schools.  When this piece was first published, Malachy Mills (a cousin), left a comment and clue…the name is Aghameen School.  The following information spooled out from that.

There is an Irish language site, Duchas.ie, with listings for Aghameen, a Louth township, the very one of the school and, very rightly, it is the name of the school.  There is even information from a teacher, Bean Ui Riada, who taught there 1937 – 1938, and posted information about local place names and legends.  Here is the link to his postings.  I learned from him that Aghameen is An tÁth Mín in Irish and means “field of the mountain meadow.”  You can see from the photographs the site is on the side of a mountain, pine forests all around.

Throughout her life my Mother had correspondence with her cousins who learned how to write in this very school.

The school existed at least since 1842. In private communication arising from this blog posting I learned a friend’s great, great grandfather, Denis Joseph Doherty, came from Donegal in that year to teach in the school and married a fellow teacher, Margaret Kane who was the girl’s school teacher. They raised a family while living at the school until moving to Jenkinstown. Margaret was from Jenkinstown, not far away and also on the Cooley Peninsula. They are Malachy Mills’ great, great, great grandparents through his mother.

Aghameen School is located on the Cooley Peninsula, County Louth, shown in the following Google Earth Image

Schoolhouse Ruin Overview from Omeath– CLICK ME!!!!

This is the exact location:
Latitude 54° 2’17.83″N
Longitude 6°16’3.08″W

To get there go to the cross-roads in Omeath and drive uphill for a few miles to a T-junction. Turn left and go through the Windy Gap past the Long Woman’s Grave (shown on the following Google Earth image). Take the right fork at the next Y intersection. Continue for 1.4 mile (2.26 kilometers) to a Y intersection, take the right fork. Continue .18 mile (.28 kilometer) to find the ruin is on your right.

Aghameen Schoolhouse Location– CLICK ME!!!!

I marked the a portion of the Tain Way with a red line where it passes near the Old Schoolhouse.

Aghameen Schoolhouse Location closer– CLICK ME!!!!

This is the road as viewed from the ruin looking south…..

Schoolhouse Ruin stone fence– CLICK ME!!!!

….and the distant view of the uniquely shaped peak Slievenaglogh to the southeast. Slievenaglogh in Irish is Sliabh na gCloch and means mountain of rocks. There is an identically named peak in the Mourne Mountains, to the north across Carlingford Loch. Slievenaglogh of Cooley Peninsula is an interesting element of south view from this valley.

Schoolhouse Ruin stone fence– CLICK ME!!!!

The ruin itself. Schoolhouse Ruin stone fence– CLICK ME!!!!

…behind a stone fence and gate posts.

Schoolhouse Ruin stone fence– CLICK ME!!!!

Overgrown with ferns, moss, grass…..

Schoolhouse Ruin stone fence– CLICK ME!!!!

…the ever present lichen.

Schoolhouse Ruin stone fence– CLICK ME!!!!

John’s son, Sean Mills, was with us.  That day, Sean lead us on Tain Way over the Golyin Pass over Slieve Foy with Carlingford as the destination.  Indeed, the Tain Way passes a few feet from this spot, being a loop of the Cooley peninsula. The Way is a two day walk, our starting point was a few miles from the schoolhouse.

Click for the previous posting in this series, “Happy Saint Patrick’s Day 2017”.

Click for the next posting in this series, “Annie Moore and her brothers”.Click for the next posting in this series, “Annie Moore and her brothers”.

Schoolhouse Ruin stone fence– CLICK ME!!!!

Glendalough View near Turlough Hill

An exceptional vista on a May afternoon

Head west from the Monastic City at the foot of the valley, climb pass the waterfalls to reach this east facing viewpoint.

I am standing near the path pilgrims from the west of Ireland travelled to the Glendalough holy sites.

Also, at my feet are “sun stones” a white quartz used by the builders of the Newgrange monument of the Boyne River Valley.

Click the link for my online gallery of Irish theme.
Click link for another Ireland Story “On the Tain Way.”

Copyright 2021 Michael Stephen Wills

Irish Countryside: the Old Aghameen School, repost

Have a wonderful July 4th Holiday (from the USA)

Click me to visit this post from Ireland.

Copyright 2020 Michael Stephen Wills All Rights Reserved

On the Tain Way, repost

A place of myth and wonder on foot and approachable

Click me to visit this Ireland post.

Copyright 2020 Michael Stephen Wills All Rights Reserved

Late May, South Rim Trail

Dangerous Practices

Today, I have a companion post to “A Summer Flower and Waterfalls” from a time of Coronavirus (COVID-19) from a walk cut short by inconsiderate people not following New York laws.

All photographs and videos are from an Apple IPhone 7.

Here is a long and close shot of Columbine Flowers thriving on the edge of a gorge cliff.

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With a video of the movement of this wildflower against a backdrop of flowing water over a 100 feet below.

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A scan of the upper gorge with some marvelous clouds.

Continuing onto the forest trail I spotted this Jack-In-The-Pulpit. Here is a photograph and short video.

My walk this day was cut short by joggers, unmasked, on the narrow trail. For each I stepped off to put 6 feet between us. So inconsiderate and unnecessary, selfish.

Copyright 2020 All Rights Reserved Michael Stephen Wills

April Freeze Slideshow

from the moss

Here is a recapitulation of my latest posts in the form of a slideshow.

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Robert H. Treman New York State Park.

Copyright 2019 All Rights Reserved Michael Stephen Wills

Icicle Macro

from the moss

The entire wall above the Cliff Stair is a ground water seep caught here by a sudden April frost.

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When the icicles melt, the moss is there relishing the moisture. Here is a link to some fascinating information from an earlier post, “Finger Lakes Water Chemistry.”

Robert H. Treman New York State Park.

Click for macro slideshow.

Copyright 2019 All Rights Reserved Michael Stephen Wills

Seep

Visible Groundwater

The fascinating walls above the 224 steps of the Cliff Stairs are a constant wonder in all seasons.

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These shots were hand held. I used a Sony Alpha 700 dslr with a variable “zoom” lens, great for framing compositions.

Robert H. Treman New York State Park.

Click for macro slideshow.

Copyright 2019 All Rights Reserved Michael Stephen Wills

Gathered Light

Each wall is support for the next flight of stairs

I walked the Rim Trail after a sudden April frost.

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These shots were hand held. I used a Sony Alpha 700 dslr with a variable “zoom” lens, great for framing compositions.

Robert H. Treman New York State Park.

Click for macro slideshow.

Copyright 2019 All Rights Reserved Michael Stephen Wills