Movement Redux

Which predominates in this series: movement or rest?

Full series of kelp in the waves. In these images I heightened the contrast of yellow-brown algae strands against dark water.

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Movement

to and fro

Photographers can spend years on the Ireland north coast understanding the play of light on water.

Our springtime evening, a few short hours, are here in this series. Today, a series of two photographs of kelp at low tide, moving with the waves. I see the possibility of a long exposure capturing the movement in one shot.

In which direction is the water/wave surge?

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Tide

Low Tide in a Long Spring Evening

Arriving at low tide, long exposure shots of surf on the pavement was not to be. Here is a rising slope of Giant’s Causeway polygonal columns, dark color marking the usual tidal high point. Above is a measuring stick.

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Behind where I stood for the above photo is a channel, perennially flooded at low tide evidenced by the thick growth of brown algae swaying back and forth with the waves.

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Kelp

Low Tide in a Long Spring Evening

Our Giant’s Causeway visit was during a long spring evening, low tide. The long strands of a kelp forest curling.

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Polygonal

Articulated Building Blocks

Look closer at the basalt column featured in yesterday’s post.

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Basalt Columns

Articulated Building Blocks — HAPPY FATHER’S DAY

“List of places with columnar jointed volcanics” is a Wikipedia page, over a hundred sites across the globe and high resolution images of Mars, these columns of Giant’s Causeway are no less marvelous for being the most famous of a phenomenon well documented.

A pile of articulated blocks, ready for assembly, next to orderly placed columns forming a pavement into the sea. Across the way, on the Isle of Mull, Scotland, a matching pavement. “Jointed” means one surface of each block is convex, the other concave, two blocks fit together.

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More humans…..

…with the stars of the show.

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Enter Humans…..

..and the first columns.

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Beach

Large Rocks and Grass

More stunning views from the Causeway Walk on the way to the main attraction. We did not explore enough to discover the sand reported to exist along the water margin.

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Brick Red

Spheroidal weathering of Basalt

Layers of red rock, lit here by sunset on Giant’s Causeway, along the cliff trail, seen here from below, are called laterite from the Latin for brick (later). Here it is formed from iron rich basalt laid down well before the upper layers of the magma plateau. It takes eons to weather and oxidize the iron of basalt, transforming it to the brick red of laterite, yet the rocks above it are still dark. The process happens in warmer climates with alternating cycles of rain and drought, for Ireland this was when the land was much farther south than today. Giant’s Causeway, County Antrim, Northern Ireland.

Here it is formed from iron rich basalt laid down well before the upper layers of the magma plateau. It takes eons to weather and oxidize the iron of basalt, transforming it to the brick red of laterite, yet the rocks above it are still dark. The process happens in warmer climates with alternating cycles of rain and drought, for Ireland this was when the land was much farther south than today.

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Lava dikes rise from the water below. Here is a wider view with the “causeway” elements with human figures in foreground.

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