Revealed Form IV

Hoary Elm in HDR

Late Winter, on the cusp of Spring, I arrived at the Cornell Experimental farm before sunrise.  

There I set up a Kodak DSC Pro SLR/c with a Canon EF 50 mm f/1.4 USM lens all mounted on a very stable Manfrotto Studio Aluminum Tripod Model 475 and Hydrostatic Ball Head. From this 15 exposures were obtained. Photoshop CS6 HDR combined the 15 into this perfected image. Cornell Thompson Experimental Farm, Town of Dryden, Tompkins County, New York

Revealed Form III

On a late winter morning on the cusp of Spring 2007 I ventured from my home on Fall Creek on a photo expedition.  

Form here is revealed through the fine snowfall dusting the evergreen boughs of this stand of pines, not enough to stop the wind for which is tract of the Cornell Thompson Research Farm is known.

Revealed Form II

On the first day of 2006 I ventured from my home on Fall Creek on a photo expedition.  

A finely shaped maple tree growing alone on a Cornell Experimental Farm field at the intersection of Fall Creek Road and Cady Lane, between Fall and Mud Creeks. Town of Dryden, Tompkins County, New York

Revealed Form I

On the first day of 2006 I ventured from my home on Fall Creek on a photo expedition.  

Each November, the eerie form of these limbs are revealed. I call the tree an “elm” though I am not certain. There are other lone survivor elms nearby, the leaves are right for an elm. Some elm species/specimens have the same shape.

Autumn Wonder

Cornell Botanical Gardens

“Cornell Botanic Gardens is a living museum with a mature botanic garden and arboretum—part of what makes Cornell one of the most beautiful campuses anywhere. We steward over 3,600 acres of biologically diverse landscapes that represent the full range of ecological communities found in the Finger Lakes region.” — from their web site

Pam and I need venture no farther than across the valley, from West to East Hill, for an experience of autumn in all its glory. These IPhone 7 photographs and videos are from a recent visit.

We took in the artistry of the railing, the stone steps, gentle curves.

I marveled at the absence of Gypsy Moth egg masses on the Oak trunks, in spite of evident though modest leaf damage.

Houston Pond is visible in several of the “Buena Vista” images…..

Houston Pond reflections from the pavilion

Another version of reflections from Houston Pond taken from pavilion

“No Place Like Home” — Back on West Hill, our Japanese Maple was waiting for us.

Copyright 2022 Michael Stephen Wills All Rights Reserved

Autumn Ithaca

Cass Park

Pam and I arrived early to Cass Park for our grandson’s October afternoon soccer match, in time for a 2 mile walk on the generous footpaths. This is my impression of that time, from the IPhone 7’s camera.

A Packed Excursion Boat Under A Stunning Sky

This completes our Sunday afternoon walk around Cass Park, Ithaca, New York.

Copyright 2022 Michael Stephen Wills All Rights Reserved

Rambling Images

Three Summer Hikes

“Out in the meadow, I picked a wild sunflower, and as I looked into its golden heart, such a wave of homesickness came over me that I almost wept.  I wanted Mother, with her gentle voice and quiet firmness; I longed to hear Father’s jolly songs and to see his twinkling blue eyes; I was lonesome for the sister with whom I used to play in the meadow picking daisies and wild sunflowers.”

from “Laura Ingalls Wilder, Farm Journalist, Writings from the Ozarks” edited by Stephen W. Hines”

Click me for “Summer Dream, Buttermilk Falls” in my Fine Art Gallery

Cornell Plantations

Click photograph for a larger view.

Taughannock Falls

Buttermilk Falls, upper

A quiet moment……

Copyright 2022, Michael Stephen Wills All Rights Reserved

Winter Captures

two captures during a time of lengthening days to welcome March 2022

Here are two offerings from winters past.

Late In the Day
Small Break Against the North Wind

Click this link for my Fine Art Gallery

Hoary Elm

This day, as our hill turns to snow globe, I remember this early morning, March 2007, on the edge of spring.  

Hoary as in covered in frost to appear bleached with age. 

As winter changed to spring I noticed the first greening of the limbs and, each November, the eerie form of the limbs revealed.  I call the tree an “elm” though I am not certain.  There are other lone survivor elms nearby, the leaves are right for an elm.  Some elm species/specimens have the same shape.

Autumn Clouds

catching late light

This evening cirrus clouds filled the sky at sunset. View the following photographs to understand how these forms are named from the Latin word for a ringlet, or curl, of hair. Formed above 16,500 feet, on this day the cirrus glow with the light of a sun low in the sky.

Here is a wide view from our driveway that includes a deteriorating con trail and possibly a mixture of other cloud types, I am no expert. I used a Canon “zoom” lens for flexibility in framing. To minimize exposure time for a crisp capture of the moving object, ISO was set to to 1,000 and the f-stop minimized.

Click any image for a larger views. Then, click again to return to post.

Post production I needed to spend time removing dust spots (neglected to clean the image sensor), some of the images still have those annoying spots.

We enjoy looking west across the valley when the hills are glowing.

Click this link for another Autumn posting, “Thin Crescent Bowl Filled with Earthglow.”

References: search for Cirrus Cloud on Wikipedia.

Copyright 2021 All Rights Reserved Michael Stephen Wills