Little Red Maple

First to flower, first to turn

Red Maple (Acer Rubrum)

The Red Maple (Acer Rubrum) is tolerant of diverse conditions, making it a perfect choice for this  spot on the short of Beebe Lake.

Maple Syrup

Even though it is not a “Sugar Maple, early spring, the sap can be boiled down to syrup.

Turning Tree

The first to flower in spring and the first to turn in autumn.

From the Top Down

This maple turns from the top down and is already bare for most top branches.

Copyright 2020 Michael Stephen Wills All Rights Reserved

A Perfect Afternoon On Beebee Lake repost

Anticipating Our Tenth Wedding Anniversary

After work on a 2008 Friday afternoon in October we sped over to Beebee Lake on the Cornell University Campus to catch the late afternoon glow……

Click Me for the complete post with photographs.

Copyright 2020 Michael Stephen Wills All Rights Reserved

Lib Slope Hickory

the largest and brightest yellow canopy on Libe Slope.

Libe Slope

Cornell University is on a west-facing hill above Cayuga lake.  Libe Slope is between the West Campus and Quadrangle / Libraries.

Besides the exercise of walking the 18 degree incline several times each day,  Cornell students and alumni remember The Slope for autumn color.

Built in 1868, McGraw Hall has the honor of having the first of Cornell’s towers. The building is built of Ithaca stone and is home to the American Studies Program, Department of History, Department of Anthropology, and Archaeology Intercollege Program. The first floor of McGraw Hall houses the McGraw Hall Museum, a collection of roughly 20,000 objects from around the globe used for teaching by the Anthropology Department.

Hickory

This is a Pignut Hickory (Carya glabra),  the largest tree  according to a 2009 Campus Tree Inventory (see link, below).

Seen from the north on a cloudy October day, this Pignut Hickory (Carya glabra) is the largest tree on the Cornell Campus, at 79 inches in diameter.

This hickory grows south of the Johnson Museum and among the autumn glories, it is the largest and brightest yellow canopy on Libe Slope.

Contrast

I remember this hickory for the contrast between the canopy and trunk, the way the clumps of yellow hang from dark boughs.  An overcast day is the best to capture this spectacle.  October 20, 2012 provided both bright sun and dark, rolling autumn clouds.  I waited on the north side, sheltered from the glare of the sky, for these perfect moments.

Leaves and Nuts

The pignut hickory is native to these Eastern United States.  It is known to favor moist slopes and this specimen has thrived on The Slope.  The ground beneath it is thick with nuts.

One week later as Hurricane Sandy approached the east coast

Just one week later, late afternoon on a sunny Friday as hurricane Sandy approached the east coast the hickory has fewer, tawny golden leaves.

Later in October the bright yellow leaves of the Libe Slope Hickory darken to a tawny gold. The Johnson Museum is in the right background.

Wonderful Flow of Limbs among Gold

Seen from the north on a cloudy October day, this Pignut Hickory (Carya glabra) is the largest tree on the Cornell Campus, at 79 inches in diameter.

References

A Photo Tour of Key Buildings at Cornell University by Allen Grove

Websites

Cornell Tree Inventory

Copyright 2020 Michael Stephen Wills All Rights Reserved

Hawks!!

The Header image is a Cocoa Beack, Florida osprey

Click me to view Red-Tailed hawks, live, on YouTube for a larger viewing experience and more context.

Click me to view “Autumn Stroll in Sapsucker Woods” by Michael Stephen Wills.

Enjoy!!

Click me to signup to watch the Hawks.

Frozen Dam

Views from the bridge on Christmas Eve 2019

Here is a companion post for last Sunday’s photographs of Beebee Lake. This was taken where the lake outflow continues as Fall Creek. Enjoy!!

Copyright 2019 All Rights Reserved Michael Stephen Wills

The Arctic?

Views from the bridge on Christmas Eve 2019

No, on the afternoon of Christmas Eve I took the 1.2 mile walk around Beebee Lake, wearing Yacktracs for the icy paths, after a series of very cold days.

Click photograph for a larger view. To do this from WordPress Reader, you need to first click the title of this post to open a new page.

The lake surface resembled the images of a Saturn moon.

It is a picturesque structure, the bridge, spanning the mouth of a water filled gorge of Fall Creek.

Here is another photograph of the interesting lake surface. All photos of this post are from my IPhone.j

Fall Creek is frozen wall to wall of the gorge.

Slideshow of photographs in this series

Copyright 2019 All Rights Reserved Michael Stephen Wills

International Space Station

pre-dawn sky event

December 23rd, sky clear at 6:30 am, the International Space Station (ISS) passed through the zenith with a waning crescent, a bowl filled with earthglow, in the southeast. On December 22nd I received the following email from NASA advising me of the event.

HQ-spotthestation@mail.nasa.gov

Sun 12/22/2019 7:00 PM

Time: Mon Dec 23 6:30 AM, Visible: 6 min, Max Height: 87°, Appears: 10° above SW, Disappears: 11° above ENE

Visit the NASA site to research if ISS viewing is possible from your location.

Here is another photograph of the crescent moon filled with earthglow.

Click photograph for the expanded view. To do this from WordPress Reader, you need to first click the title of this post to open a new page.
Copyright 2020 All Rights Reserved Michael Stephen Wills

Earthglow

pre-dawn sky event

December 23rd, sky clear at 6:30 am, the International Space Station passed through the zenith with a waning crescent, a bowl filled with earthglow, in the southeast. Here is a photograph of a waning moon above Cornell University from October 2017.

Click photograph for the expanded view. To do this from WordPress Reader, you need to first click the title of this post to open a new page.
Copyright 2020 All Rights Reserved Michael Stephen Wills

Autumn Clouds

catching late light

This evening cirrus clouds filled the sky at sunset. View the following photographs to understand how these forms are named from the Latin word for a ringlet, or curl, of hair. Formed above 16,500 feet, on this day the cirrus glow with the light of a sun low in the sky.

Here is a wide view from our driveway that includes a deteriorating con trail and possibly a mixture of other cloud types, I am no expert. I used a Canon “zoom” lens for flexibility in framing. To minimize exposure time for a crisp capture of the moving object, ISO was set to to 1,000 and the f-stop minimized.

Click any image for a larger views. Then, click again to return to post.

Post production I needed to spend time removing dust spots (neglected to clean the image sensor), some of the images still have those annoying spots.

We enjoy looking west across the valley when the hills are glowing.

Click this link for another Autumn posting, “Thin Crescent Bowl Filled with Earthglow.”

References: search for Cirrus Cloud on Wikipedia.

Copyright 2019 All Rights Reserved Michael Stephen Wills

Frogs!!

A summertime visit to Sapsucker Woods

Wednesday last, grandson Sam, who’s three, and I wandered the landscape, catching the sights of summer. Eventually, we visited Sapsucker Woods, a Cornell University nature preserve. There, a boardwalk over the swamp is a proven venue for frog spotting and, this day, we had some success.

We found this cooperative golden-eyed beauty calmly squatting and croaking.

In this 30 second clip, reflected light off the water surface captures proto-croaks that did not quite escape from the source. There is a successful and full croak finale.

Off the boardwalk, we took a short detour to view an elaborate cairn built of local rock by a famous artist. The dappled sunlight across the surface is especially enjoyable.

The Sapsucker Cairn, Andrew Goldsworthy

At the furthest extent of the preserve is this pond where the residents were notably raucous in this 30 second clip.

About this time the mosquitoes descended for a determined attack on Sam’s legs. “Itchy,” he said. Myself, protected by deet, they left alone. Sam’s Mom prepared him for the trip with natural mosquito repellent that was not up to the task. Next time we visit, Sam will wear long pants and sleeves fortified with deet.

Just before picking Sam up for a quick retreat, I caught this turtle encrusted in duckweed sunning on a narrow branch. The head is retracted for the moment, can you imagine someone wading through that muck to place a rock? It is possible, but I witnessed the head, so am absolutely sure.

Special thanks to blogger shoreacres for the identification of duckweed. In my original posting I called it algae.

Click me for another Sapsucker Woods posting.

Copyright 2019 Michael Stephen Wills All Rights Reserved.